Occipital Condyle Fracture – A Diagnosis Requiring High Suspicion

  • GOPAL SEDAIN Assistant Professor Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu Nepal
  • PRAKASH KAFLE Department of Neurosurgery, Nobel Medical College, Biratnagar, Nepal
  • SUSHIL KRISHNA SHILPAKAR Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu Nepal
  • MOHAN RAJ Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu Nepal
  • AMIT B. PRADHANANG Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu Nepal
  • BINOD RAJBHANDARI Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu Nepal
  • DIPENDRA SHRESTHA Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu Nepal
Keywords: Cranial nerve palsy, Occipital condyle fracture, Spinal instability

Abstract

Traumatic injury causing occipital condyle fractures (OCF) are very rare. They are of critical clinical importance owing toimportant anatomical structures that need considerations of the occiput-atlantoaxial joint complex. Early diagnosis is of paramount importance since there may be associated lower cranial nerve palsies along with cervical spinal instability. Sometimes, this can be a diagnostic challenge in acute stage because of the inability to diagnose this injury with plain radiographs. To avoid this, high index of suspicion and relevant investigation of the craniocervical junction is indicated. Hence it helps in early recognition and diagnosis of OCF thus preventing possible neurological impairment. Here, we report a case of a 58 -year-old male who presented with complaints of neck pain and headache following physical assault.

References

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Published
2018-12-14
Section
Case Reports