Brain Death Islamic Perspective

  • FAUZIA SAJJAD Punjab Institute of Neurosciences, Lahore
  • REHAN SHAHID Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC), Lahore
  • MUKHTIAR AHMED Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC), Lahore
  • Zain Saleh Punjab Institute of Neurosciences, Lahore
  • AHSAN DR Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC), Lahore
  • SUNDUS ALI Mayo Hospital, Lahore
  • MUHAMMAD AKMAL Department of Neurosurgery, Punjab Institute of Neurosciences (PINS), Lahore
  • KAMRAN KHAN Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC), Lahore
Keywords: Brain death, Islam, Do Not Resuscitate

Abstract

Western world has well defined criteria for declaring the patient brain dead and discontinuation of life support treatment. However in the Muslim world these methods and practices are seen with skepticism as to their acceptance from Islamic and Sharia point op view, which in fact is incorrect and is due to lack of knowledge and absence of Institutional guidelines on this matter. Islamic law permits the withdrawal of futile treatment, including life support, from brain dead patients allowing death to take its natural course. “Do not resuscitate” is permitted in Islamic law in brain dead patients. Euthenesia is however unacceptable in Islam. Although debate continues about the details of brain death criteria within Islamic scholars, brain death is accepted as true death by the majority of Mulim scholars and there is concensus on discontinuation of life support treatment in brain dead patients.

References

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Published
2020-04-11
Section
Review Article